Schedule of events

Monday, November 18
1:00 PM

CSBA Board of Directors Meeting

3:00 PM

Apiary Board Meeting

7:00 PM

Party on the Patio – President’s Opening Reception

Tuesday, November 19
8:00 AM

Registration and Exhibits Open

9:00 AM

Opening Ceremonies and Committee Reports

  • Legislative Report and Right to Farm Update
  • American Honey Producers Update
  • American Beekeeping Federation Update
10:00 AM

Refreshment Break

In the Exhibit Hall
10:30 AM

What Effect Do Combinations of Insecticides, Fungicides and Adjuvants Have on Honey Bee Larvae, Workers and Queens?

Tank-mix combinations of insecticides, fungicides and adjuvants are commonly applied to almonds while in bloom. While regulatory testing has been performed on many of these products alone their safety to honey bees has not been determined when applied in combination, as they are typically applied. This talk will cover ongoing research aimed at determining the role that tank-mix combinations have on worker adults, worker larvae and developing exposure to field-relevant combinations of these pesticides.

Reed Johnson, Associate Professor, Ohio State University
11:30 AM

Indoor Storage of Commercial Colonies: Implications for Pest Management and Swarm Control

Interest in the practice of indoor wintering has been progressively increasing. New purpose-built buildings are being constructed each year; spurred on by reports of improved winter survival. The main focus for the use of the buildings have been for storing bees during the winter months prior to almond pollination. There remains a big potential for use of those same refrigerated spaces for colony storage at times other than the wintering period. One exciting potential use is the forced reduction or cessation of brood rearing to improve varroa control. Preliminary data suggests it is possible with little or no reduction in colony performance. However the timing and specific effects on colony metrics remains to be studied. This report focuses on the manipulation of storage time after almond pollination and the effects on brood rearing and swarming behavior. Additional details about ongoing studies on indoor winter effects on varroa mortality and Nosema will be presented.

Brandon Hopkins, Assistant Research Professor, Washington State University
12:00 PM

Lunch on Your Own

1:15 PM

Platinum Sponsor Presentation

Beekeeping Insurance Services
1:30 PM

Progress in Developing a Novel Nosema Treatment Agent

The microsporidian species Nosema ceranae can cause individual mortality in honey bees, and have been implicated in colony collapse. N. ceranae infection was historically controlled by treatment with the drug Fumagillin, which has issues and is currently due to production problems. Thus, efforts to find alternative treatment strategies are critical to protect honey bees from this parasite. In our studies of cell stress, my lab has found that N. ceranae is more sensitive to certain types of cellular stresses than its honey bee host. Of special interest, we observed increased sensitivity of N. ceranae cells to pharmacological inhibition of the Ubiquitin Proteasome System relative to honey bees. In this presentation, I will describe our progress in characterizing such compounds as effective anti-Nosema chemical agents.

Jonathan Snow, Assistant Professor of Biological Sciences, Barnard College
2:30 PM

Refreshment Break

In the Exhibit Hall
3:00 PM

Predicting and Preventing Colony Losses

Managed honey bee colonies have been dying at high rates for too long. There is general agreement that varroa (and the viruses they transmit), poor nutrition and pesticides all play a role in these high loss rates. Here we review the current evidence of the risk posed by different factors by examining our ability to predict mortality based on different levels of exposure. Using the Bee Informed partnership data as well as data from the National Honey Bee disease survey, we will explore management practices that increase survivorship, obstacles that prevent management practices from working, and innovative ways to more actually predict colony health in the future. Most important, we will talk about ways all beekeepers can help collect and contribute to these efforts.

Dennis vanEngelsdorp, University of Maryland
4:00 PM

How to Be Compliant with Department of Transportation Rules and Regulations

This presentation will address current drivers’ hours of service regulations and applicable exemptions relative to the interstate transportation of bees, the status of a February 2019 application to FMCSA for additional exemptions, and an overview of Frequently Asked Questions to the agency.

Greg Bragg, State Program Specialist / Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (California Division)
5:00 PM - 8:00 PM

Exhibitors’ Welcome Reception

Wednesday, November 20
7:00 AM - 9:00 AM

American Sioux Honey Association Members Breakfast

8:00 AM

Registration Continues, Exhibits Open

9:00 AM

Evaluation of Fungal Products for Colony Health Parameters in Commercial Colonies

The discovery that bees naturally forage on fungal secretions led us to test the effects of adding fungal extracts to honey bee diets. Extracts from polypore mushroom mycelium added to sugar water feed significantly reduced the levels of viruses in honey bees kept in laboratory cages. We have now tested the fungal extracts in full-sized colonies in the field in several large-scale collaborations with commercial beekeepers. In addition to testing the effects of extracts on the honey bee viruses DWV, LSV, VDV, and BQCV, we are testing the ability of extracts to control Nosema. In another set of cage experiments, we have documented the lifespan-extending effects of extracts and we are investigating the effects on the honey bee immune system.

Dr. Nick Naeger and Dr. Jennifer Han, Washington State University
10:00 AM

Refreshment Break

In the Exhibit Hall
10:00 AM - 4:00 PM

A Day at The California Master Beekeeper Program

Learn how the California Master Beekeeper Program (CAMBP) is inspiring science-based beekeeping and honey bee ambassadorship across the state. Enjoy a short introductory presentation on the CAMBP and meet the members of this growing community.
Please join our Apprentice and Journey Level California Master Beekeepers for some fun, interactive science-based activities. By the end of your visit to the CAMBP room, you will be able to identify AFB, test and count Nosema spores with a hemocytometer, dissect a honey bee and look for tracheal mites, and identify and learn to mitigate for Small Hive Beetles and Varroa mites.
The CAMBP experience is kid-friendly when children are accompanied by an adult. Activities complements of the E. L. Niño Bee Lab’s Pollinator Education Program.

10:30 AM

Panel Discussion: Honey Board

Moderated by Margaret Lombard, CEO National Honey Board
11:45 AM

Platinum Sponsor Presentation

Barkman Honey
12:00 PM

Research Luncheon + Keynote “Honey Bee Nutrition: Pollen to Probiotics”

This presentation will primarily focus on the importance of bee nutrition, knowledge gaps in nutrition and strategies to improve bee nutrition. Further, ongoing research pertaining to phytosterols and probiotics at Oregon State University will also be discussed briefly.

Ticket Purchase Required

Ramesh Sagili, Associate Professor, Oregon State University
2:00 PM

Research Auction

4:00 PM

Free Time

7:00 PM

Resolutions Committee Meeting

7:30 PM

Research Committee Meeting

Thursday, November 21
8:00 AM

Registration Continues, Exhibits Open

8:30 AM

Member Breakfast + Keynote “News From the Bee Research World”

Dr. Niño will present research and extension update from the UC Davis Bee Biology Program. The presentation will also cover honey bee research highlights from across the world.

Ticket Purchase Required for non-voting members

Elina L. Niño, Ph.D. – Apiculture Extension and Research, UC Davis
9:30 AM

CSBA Annual Business Meeting

10:00 AM

The Use of RFID Technology to Determine if Feeding Honey Bees Carbon Microparticles Can Ameliorate the Effects of Sublethal Consumption of Pesticides

Absorbent, carbonaceous materials such as activated carbon is commonly used to remove pesticide residues and other hazardous chemicals from water. Building on the concept of utilizing carbonaceous material to absorb and render pesticides inert; a researcher at WSU developed a form of carbon microparticle (CM) specifically to mix into honey bee feed with the intention of absorbing toxic pesticide compounds before they harm the bee or the colony. We used RFID to measure forager return times after feeding on a pesticide-laced syrup. The concept is to measure how long it takes foragers to fly from the hive to the food source and then back to the hive.

Saffet Sansar, Washington State University
10:30 AM

Refreshment Break

Sponsored By Mann Lake
11:00 AM

County/State Regulatory Update: Bee Importations, Bee Safe and Bee Where

Approximately 1.8 million bee colonies are imported into California each year. Sometimes these colonies carry hitchhiking insect and weed pests which would be detrimental to the environment and/or agricultural industry if introduced into the state. To safeguard against this, all colonies must be inspected prior to entry and at the destination. This presentation will cover statistical trends in apiary importations, pest finds and information about ongoing efforts to facilitate the movement of bees into California through a pre-inspection at the origin. The California Department of Food and Agriculture (CDFA) has implemented the Bee Safe Program to protect pollinators and the beekeeping industry from negative impacts caused by apiary theft, pests and diseases, lack of adequate forage, and exposure to pesticides. The Bee Safe Program directs $1.5 million annually to the County Agricultural Commissioners’ (CAC) offices, to reimburse their efforts to develop, implement, and report on activities associated with this program. CAC are granted authority to enforce various apiary and pest prevention laws intended to ensure the vitality of the beekeeping industry. This presentation will cover the new Bee Safe Program, apiary regulations in California, and provide an update on the BeeWhere project.

Patricia Bohls, CDFA Bee Safe Program
Ruben Arroyo, Riverside County Ag. Commissioner
12:00 PM

Refreshments for Research

Come enjoy a generous array of appetizers all while you sip and taste some of Temecula’s finest wine and beer.

Ticket Purchase Required

12:00 PM

Lunch on Your Own

1:15 PM

Platinum Sponsor Presentation

Mann Lake
1:30 PM

Testing a Queen Vaccine Against Chalkbrood Infection

We will present preliminary findings of a field trial conducted in Summer 2019 where we examined immune priming in offspring of queens given an oral vaccine against Ascosphaera apis (chalkbrood). Our goal was to determine if vaccination affects the egg-laying ability of queens and whether there is an increase in fitness-related traits (i.e., emergence success and adult bee longevity) for offspring of vaccinated queens following exposure to A. apis.

Mike Goblirsch, Post-Doctoral Researcher, University of Minnesota
2:30 PM

Is the Brood Pattern within a Honey Bee Colony a Reliable Indicator of Queen Quality?

Failure of the queen is often identified as a leading cause of honey bee colony mortality. However, the factors that can contribute to “queen failure” are poorly defined and often misunderstood. We studied one specific sign attributed to queen failure: poor brood pattern. In 2016 and 2017, we identified pairs of colonies with “good” and “poor” brood patterns in commercial beekeeping operations and used standard metrics to assess queen and colony health. We found no queen quality measures reliably associated with poor-brood colonies. In the second year (2017), we exchanged queens between colony pairs (n = 21): a queen from a poor-brood colony was introduced into a good-brood colony and vice versa. We observed that brood patterns of queens originally from poor-brood colonies significantly improved after placement into a good-brood colony after 21 days, suggesting factors other than the queen contributed to brood pattern. Our study challenges the notion that brood pattern alone is sufficient to judge queen quality. Our results emphasize the challenges in determining the root source for problems related to the queen when assessing honey bee colony health.

Katie Lee, Cariveau Native Bee Lab, University of Minnesota
3:30 PM

Platinum Sponsor Presentation

Bee Technologies, LLC / The B App
4:00 PM

Microalgae as a Promising and Sustainable Nutrition Supplement for Honey Bees

Microalgae are rich in essential nutrients for honey bees, leading to a nutritional profile that more closely resembles pollen than commonly used feed ingredients (i.e. soy, yeast, egg). Mass cultivation of algae can be considered an environmentally positive, highly productive alternative to current monocrop systems that negatively impact bee health. Furthermore, the price of algae for animal feed is predicted to drop substantially as algae farming subsidies become more prevalent. Here we report our progress on evaluating the use of microalgae as a nutrition supplement for honey bees in the laboratory and in the field.

Vincent Ricigliano, USDA
6:30 PM

Social Hour & Silent Auction

Appetizers Sponsored by The Ashurst Family "Celebrating 100 Years of Beekeeping"
7:30 PM

Annual Banquet Dinner and 2018 & 2019 Award Presentations,
followed by Surprise Entertainment!

Ticket Purchase Required

 

Friday, November 22
8:00 AM

CSBA Board of Directors Meeting